Sunday, December 13, 2009

Hoster Strato offers IPv6

The German hoster Strato now offers IPv6 on it's Highspeed-Server products. The official communication says "IPv6 Ready (Beta)". I hope "IPv6 Ready" does mean it really does IPv6. (Remember: all current operating systems are already IPv6 Ready, but mostly IPv6 is not activated nor used :-( )

Details of the offering here: http://www.strato.de/server/dedicated/highq/index.html


Thursday, December 10, 2009

Silly uTorrent: "hostname not found" for IPv6-only tracker on stupid Windows Vista

uTorrent is a great graphical tool to activate Teredo IPv6 on Windows XP.

However, uTorrent on Windows Vista is quite silly: with the IPv6-only tracker tracker.sixxs.net, uTorrent says "hostname not found". Grrrr! And do remember: on Vista Teredo IPv6 is enabled by default, so IPv6 should work.

Probably uTorrent is using Vista's braindead name resolving, meaning: no AAAA lookups with Teredo IPv6.

Advice @ uTorrent developers: on Windows Vista, do an explicit AAAA lookup ... please!


Sunday, December 6, 2009

Improved Teredo / Miredo: three suggestions

If 6to4 can be improved (see 6rd here), why not improve Teredo / Miredo? As a happy Teredo / Miredo user, I have a few suggestions:

First: Make Teredo an ISP service, by strongly binding it to the ISP: teredo server, teredo relay and addresses from the ISP. That way, ISPs have an incentive to deploy Teredo / Miredo infrastructures: help their own customers (instead of helping random people accross the Internet). This way, we would no longer have the 2001:0: teredo addresses, but ISP addresses like 2001:888:.

Second: Change Christian Huitema's Teredo protocol so that one teredo instance on a LAN can serve as a gateway for the other device on the LAN. I think one of the things thas to change, is the teredo addressing. See here for the current addressing:

Bits 0 - 31 32 - 63 64 - 79 80 - 95 96 - 127
Length 32 bits 32 bits 16 bits 16 bits 32 bits
Description Prefix Teredo
server IPv4
Flags Obfuscated
UDP port
Client
public IPv4
Part 2001:0000 4136:e378 8000 63bf 3fff:fdd2
Decoded
65.54.227.120 cone NAT 40000 192.0.2.45



My suggestion is to swap the two right hand parts ("Obfuscated UDP Port" and "Client Public IPv4"). Goal of this swap is that the last 16 bits can be freely changed, and thus used as addresses for other devices on the LAN. I guess those addresses can be assigned via RADVD or DHCPv6. The Teredo client would thus become a IPv6 gateway. The advantage is that devices on the LAN that can do simple IPv6 but not Teredo, will now be IPv6 connected to the Internet.


Third (and this is Microsoft-Teredo-only, not Miredo): Microsoft, please enable Windows Vista (and Windows 7?) to actually *use* Teredo IPv6 in the application layer. Now, a Vista machine will have IPv6 connectivity, but typing ipv6.google.com in the web browser will result in an error; apparently Windows won't lookup or use the IPv6 name & connectivity.

PS:

Fourth: modem suppliers should specify whether their modems let pass Teredo traffic. Just like the modem suppliers tell whether their modems let VPNs pass.

6rd: improved 6to4

Rémi Després has developed "6rd" (IPv6 Rapid Deployment), which is an
improved version of 6to4: 6rd has the good things of 6to4 (easy IPv6
over IPv4 tunnel technique), but has taken care of one of the Bad
Things of 6to4: with 6rd the IPv6-over-IPv4 tunnel is completely
handled by the customer's own ISP, instead of some random unknown 6to4
gateway on the Internet. So, with 6rd you get an IPv6 from your ISP,
not a 2002: address.

IMHO, one Bad Thing of 6to4 remains in 6rd: it is not desgined to work
from behind NAT. In my experience, 6to4 might or might not work behind
NAT: It depends on the NAT device: does it handle Protocol 41 or GRE
tunnels. Brrr ...
So the best solution is the deploy 6rd / 6to4 on the NAT device
itself. So far, only Free has deployed 6rd on it's self-developed
Freebox. So the wait continues for the usual suspects: when do Thomson
Speedtouch, Zyxel, Linksys, AVM Fritzbox deploy 6rd on their DSL
modems?


Relevant URLs:
http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-despres-6rd-03
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/6rd (alert: in French!)

Sunday, November 29, 2009

SABnzbd's webinterface on IPv6

The great NZB downloader SABnzbd is fully IPv6 enabled:
  • you can download from IPv6 newsservers, like new.ipv6.eweka.nl and newszilla6.xs4all.nl. This feature is enabled by default.
  • you can access SABnzbd's webinterface over IPv6. See instruction below.
Here's how to make SABnzbd's webinterface accessable over IPv6: go to http://localhost:8080/sabnzbd/config/general/ . Find this part:


SABnzbd Host:
Host SABnzbd should listen on.


There fill out:


::


Then click save and restart SABnzbd. You can now access SABnzbd over it's private and public IPv6 interface:


http://ip6-localhost:8080/sabnzbd/
http://[::1]:8080/sabnzbd/
http://[2001:8348:3a3:0:224:2cff:fe6a:66ab]:8080/sabnzbd/

BTW: as of SABnzbd 0.5.0, you don't need the 'sabnzbd' anymore in the URL, so the very cryptical http://[::1]:8080/ is also OK!

Friday, November 20, 2009

CouchDB ... with IPv6?!

... brute force grepping on the CouchDB source code seems to reveal there is IPv6 in CouchDB. Now I have to find out how to enable it ...

UPDATE:

Thanks to JanL's comment, my CouchDB instance now works over IPv6 (::1):

I added the IPv6 localhost address ::1 to "bind_address" in /etc/couchdb/local.ini, like this:



[httpd]
;port = 5984
;bind_address = 127.0.0.1
bind_address = ::1


After a restart, CouchDB now listens on http://[::1]:5984/_utils/



UPDATE 2:

I added :: to "bind_address" in /etc/couchdb/local.ini, like this:



[httpd]
;port = 5984
;bind_address = 127.0.0.1
bind_address = ::


After a restart, CouchDB now listens on the public IPv6 address! Great!



sander@quirinius:~/apache-couchdb-0.10.0$ egrep -i -e inet6 -e inet4 -e inet6fb4 -e ipv6 * */* */*/* */*/*/* */*/*/*/*
CHANGES: * CouchDB can now be bound to IPv6 addresses.
src/mochiweb/mochiweb_socket_server.erl:ipv6_supported() ->
src/mochiweb/mochiweb_socket_server.erl:    case (catch inet:getaddr("localhost", inet6)) of
src/mochiweb/mochiweb_socket_server.erl:            case ipv6_supported() of % IPv4, and IPv6 if supported
src/mochiweb/mochiweb_socket_server.erl:                true -> [inet, inet6 | BaseOpts];
src/mochiweb/mochiweb_socket_server.erl:        {_, _, _, _, _, _, _, _} -> % IPv6
src/mochiweb/mochiweb_socket_server.erl:            [inet6, {ip, Ip} | BaseOpts]
sander@quirinius:~/apache-couchdb-0.10.0$

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

IPv6 an overwhelming success: "Too many connections to server news.ipv6.eweka.nl:119"

It's clear: IPv6 is an overwhelming success!

Proof is here: "Too many connections to server news.ipv6.eweka.nl:119".

;-)

But seriously: give users a reason for IPv6 (free downloads!), and they will start using IPv6.

Friday, October 9, 2009

Make your IPv4 site IPv6 enabled ... easy and free

Make your IPv4 site IPv6 enabled ... easy and free ... via http://ipv6proxy.prolocation.net/index1.php


Enable IPv6 for your website

Welcome to the IPv6 website Proxy. This portal empowers you to make your current IPv4 website reachable via IPv6.

Your website will only be available via this IPv6 proxy service if you'd add an AAAA record in your current DNS settings. This means that your website IPv6 addre ss has to resolve to the following address: 2a00:d00:ff:131:94:228:131:131

So, if you've a website called "www.example.com", you should add the following DNS entry to the DNS zone of example.com:
"www.example.com AAAA 2a00:d00:ff:131:94:228:131:131"

The final step you should take is filling in the name of the website you would like to proxy.


For that last step, go to the mentioned URL.

That's it!

Monday, October 5, 2009

Dutch Weather Forecast via IPv6

Found via http://sixy.ch/ (a site with an overview of IPv6 enabled sites): the Dutch weather forecast of the KNMI is available via IPv6: www6.knmi.nl .



Name: www6.knmi.nl
Addresses: 2001:610:178:ec::96
145.23.253.254

Sunday, August 30, 2009

Practice your German ... over IPv6 ;-)

The great German magazine C'T has put their website on IPv6, via a separate URL:



So you can now practice your German (reading) over IPv6. ;-)



Wednesday, July 22, 2009

North American IPv6 Task Force: "At least half of U.S. CIOs have IPv6 on their networks"

Yet another interesting quote:

"At least half of U.S. CIOs have IPv6 on their networks that they don't know about, but the hackers do," says Yanick Pouffary, technology director for the North American IPv6 Task Force and an HP Distinguished Technologist. "You can't ignore IPv6. You need to take the minimum steps to secure your perimeter. You need firewalls that understand IPv4 and IPv6. You need network management tools that understand IPv4 and IPv6."


So, at least half of the U.S. companies have IPv6 enabled networks? I guess that's good news! Until now, I heard that too little US companies were doing IPv6, and it would take billions of dollars to get IPv6. Now we learn IPv6 is already there. Great!

So, 40 years later, we can all say "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind".


More interesting (or confusing?) Pv6 stuff here:

http://edge.networkworld.com/news/2009/071309-rogue-ipv6.html
http://www.itworld.com/networking/71015/five-biggest-ipv6-based-threats-facing-cios


Juniper: "look for IPv6 traffic and drop it"

Interesting quote from Juniper:

"What customers need to do within their intrusion-prevention systems or within their firewalls is to explicitly look for IPv6 traffic and drop it,'' says Tim LeMaster, director of systems engineering for Juniper's Federal group.

So Juniper is advising to drop IPv6 traffic?! Interesting point of view from a network hardware vendor; I would expect such a vendor to say "You need IPv6. Buy my stuff that does IPv6".

Oh, wait: maybe the reasoning is this: "You need to drop IPv6. Buy my stuff that can drop IPv6.".


See more "IPv6 is dangerous" stuff here:

http://edge.networkworld.com/news/2009/071309-rogue-ipv6.html
http://www.itworld.com/networking/71015/five-biggest-ipv6-based-threats-facing-cios



Saturday, June 27, 2009

Dutch ISP Introweb does IPv6 (-only)

The Dutch ISP "Introweb" is now offering IPv6 over ADSL. See the Dutch information here: http://www.introweb.nl/producten/categorien/internet_toegang/economy_adsl/ipv6_adsl.shtml

It's good to see that an ISP actually offers IPv6 instead of talking about what others should do in the RSN future. ;-(

A few things are especially noteworthy:
  • It's a IPv6-only connection. So you need a separate plain IPv4 connection. I think this will mislead IPv6 newcomers that IPv6 needs different hardware, connections, etc.
  • It only costs 6 Euro per month.
  • Only available for a limited number of customers
  • Using a Cisco 8xx DSL router

Furthermore: Introweb has it's own website www.introweb.nl on IPv6 too: http://[2001:1690:2:4::1:3]/

Kudo's to Introweb for doing IPv6!


Thursday, June 4, 2009

D-Link DIR-825 home router does IPv6

D-Link has introduced a wireless router named DIR-825 which seems to do IPv6. D-Link itself provides very little information about the IPv6. I only found some information in this pdf ftp://ftp.dlink.eu/datasheets/DIR-825.pdf

IPV6 READY
This router carries both the silver and gold IPv6 Ready logos, signifying that it not only supports the IPv6 protocol, but is also compatible with IPv6 equipment from other manufacturers. It allows you to move to a 128-bit addressing system and directly connect to anybody in the world using your unique IP address. Using a dual-stack architecture, this router can handle routing for both IPv4 and IPv6 networks at the same time, so you can be assured that your equipment is forward and backward compatible

That information is not very useful.

The German magazine C'T provides a bit more information: IPv6 over PPPoE or DHCPv6 for native IPv6 to the ISP. If that does not work, the DIR-825 will use 6to4 or 6in4 tunnels.

The price is a quite high: 160 Euro.


Friday, May 8, 2009

Help needed: Remote Desktop from Ubuntu to Windows Vista Home Premium over IPv6

I'm looking for help:

I want to use my Ubuntu Linux to access the desktop of a Windows Vista Home Premium over IPv6.

I tried to use rdesktop, but that did not work (even not over IPv4 on a LAN). Reason: Home Premium cannot "receive" Remote Desktop sessions. See screendump: there's only a 'Remote Assistance' option, which is not Remote Desktop. (One of those reasons I don't like Windows.)
There seems to be a hack for this (see http://portal.tonychan.org/Default.aspx?tabid=58&EntryID=123), but that resulted in errors. I could try to solve that by de-activating UAC, but it all feels a bit ugly.

I then tried VNC, but all VNC version (original VNC, ultraVNC, tightVNC) seem to have small or big problems with Windows Vista.


So: tips welcome!



PS: Related, but no solution: Tiberius was able to 'Remote Desktop' to Windows XP! This was based on some ipv6 to ipv4 tunnel trick.

Sunday, March 22, 2009

'No business case for IPv6, survey finds - Network World'

Ah, finally: the truth is there:


From the page No business case for IPv6, survey finds - Network World:

No business case for IPv6, survey finds

But Internet Society members report rising customer demand, deployment plans


Business incentives are completely lacking today for upgrading to IPv6, the next generation Internet protocol, according to a survey of network operators conducted by the Internet Society (ISOC).

In a new report, ISOC says that ISPs, enterprises and network equipment vendors report that there are ``no concrete business drivers for IPv6.''


However, survey respondents said customer demand for IPv6 is on the rise and that they are planning or deploying IPv6 because they feel it is the next major development in the evolution of the Internet.


Yeah, right: "planning IPv6".

Saturday, March 14, 2009

Remote Desktop Viewer VNC over IPv6: works on Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty (Alpha 6)

Wow, this is cool: the Remote Desktop Viewer (VNC) in Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty works over IPv6. I'm testing this on Jaunty Alpha 6 and it just works: type in the IPv6 address like [2001::1:2:3] or the full name, and connect. You can also use "vinagre <ipv6 name or address" from the command line.

BTW: a desktop that's viewable, is also announce via Avahi / Zeroconf / Rendezvous. That's handy on LANs.

PS: You can make your own Ubuntu desktop viewable via System -> Preferences -> Remote Desktop.

'Uitzendingen SURFnet-TV' ... IPv6 no go ... :-(

Anybody successfully playing radio over ipv6 from the Surfnet website (see below)? I get ugly errors trying to use http://www.surfnet-tv.nl/streamgate/radio1-sb_IPv6.asx , both with totem and vlc.

Maybe Surfnet is keeping IPv6 Radio to themselves? Or is it just a miredo/teredo routing problem?



From the page Uitzendingen SURFnet-TV:


Radio over IPv6:
(Test of je netwerkverbinding geschikt is voor IPv6.)

Command line output:

sander@linuxmint6 ~ $ vlc http://www.surfnet-tv.nl/streamgate/radio1-sb_IPv6.asx
VLC media player 0.9.4 Grishenko
[00000001] main libvlc debug: VLC media player - version 0.9.4 Grishenko - (c) 1996-2008 the VideoLAN team
[00000001] main libvlc debug: libvlc was configured with ./configure  '--build=i486-linux-gnu' '--enable-maintaner-mode' '--enable-release' '--prefix=/usr' '--enable-libtool' '--enable-fast-install' '--with-binary-version=1ubuntu3' '--disable-update-check' '--disable-gnome' '--disable-gtk' '--disable-familiar' '--disable-fb' '--enable-ggi' '--enable-sdl' '--enable-esd' '--enable-mad' '--enable-arts' '--enable-jack' '--enable-pulse' '--enable-lirc' '--enable-a52' '--enable-aa' '--enable-dvbpsi' '--enable-mozilla' '--with-mozilla-pkg=libxul-plugin' '--disable-kde' '--enable-mp4' '--enable-dvb' '--disable-satellite' '--enable-ogg' '--enable-vorbis' '--enable-shout' '--enable-qt4' '--disable-slp' '--enable-flac' '--disable-skins' '--disable-basic-skins' '--enable-skins2' '--enable-freetype' '--enable-mkv' '--enable-speex' '--enable-caca' '--enable-live555' '--enable-libmpeg2' '--enable-fribidi' '--enable-cdio' '--enable-mod' '--enable-theora' '--enable-modplug' '--enable-dvdnav' '--enable-gnutls' '--enable-ffmpeg' '--enable-ncurses' '--enable-smb' '--disable-gnomevfs' '--enable-bonjour' '--enable-mpc' '--enable-vcd' '--enable-vcdx' '--enable-notify' '--enable-twolame' '--enable-x264' '--enable-faad' '--disable-zvbi' '--enable-telx' '--enable-mediacontrol-bindings' '--disable-atmo' '--enable-taglib' '--enable-libass' '--enable-libdca' '--enable-alsa' '--enable-dv' '--enable-v4l' '--enable-v4l2' '--enable-pvr' '--enable-svgalib' '--enable-dvd' '--without-dvdcss' 'build_alias=i486-linux-gnu' 'CFLAGS=-g -O2' 'LDFLAGS=-Wl,--as-needed' 'CPPFLAGS=' 'CXXFLAGS=-g -O2'
[00000001] main libvlc debug: translation test: code is "C"
[00000001] main libvlc: Running vlc with the default interface. Use 'cvlc' to use vlc without interface.
[00000410] main access error: connection failed: No route to host
[00000450] main access error: connection failed: No route to host
QPainter::begin: Paint device returned engine == 0, type: 1
QPainter::begin: Paint device returned engine == 0, type: 1
QPainter::begin: Paint device returned engine == 0, type: 1
QPainter::begin: Paint device returned engine == 0, type: 1
QPainter::begin: Paint device returned engine == 0, type: 1
[00000502] access_mms access error: failed to open a connection (tcp)
[00000502] access_mms access error: failed to open a connection (tcp)
[00000502] access_mms access error: cannot connect to server
[00000502] access_mms access error: cannot connect to wm1-6.nij.cdn.surf.net:80
[00000500] main input error: open of `mms://wm1-6.nij.cdn.surf.net/reflector01' failed: could not create access
sander@linuxmint6 ~ $

Maybe it's just a teredo / miredo problem as I can't reach wm1-6.nij.cdn.surf.net at all from my 2001:0: address:

sander@linuxmint6 ~ $ traceroute6 wm1-6.nij.cdn.surf.net
traceroute to wm1-6.nij.cdn.surf.net (2001:610:0:800a:192:87:5:243) from 2001:0:53aa:64c:26:9679:ad55:e84b, 30 hops max, 16 byte packets
 1  * 2001:0:53aa:64c:26:9679:ad55:e84b (2001:0:53aa:64c:26:9679:ad55:e84b)  0.275 ms !H  0.138 ms !H

sander@linuxmint6 ~ $ traceroute6 news6.xs4all.nl
traceroute to news6.xs4all.nl (2001:888:0:4::119:119) from 2001:0:53aa:64c:26:9679:ad55:e84b, 30 hops max, 16 byte packets
 1  teredo-relay.proserve.nl (2001:828:101:1::101)  173.309 ms  22.637 ms  24.767 ms
 2  cr2.eun.nl.proserve.nl (2001:828:101:1::1)  97.892 ms  23.375 ms  28.736 ms
 3  * pc-2.cr1.eun.proserve.nl (2001:828:101:15::2)  72.524 ms  23.359 ms
 4  ams-ix.sara.xs4all.net (2001:7f8:1::a500:3265:1)  75.963 ms  23.085 ms  23.41 ms
 5  0.so-1-0-0.xr3.3d12.xs4all.net (2001:888:0:105::1)  68.844 ms  54.129 ms  28.47 ms
 6  news6.xs4all.nl (2001:888:0:4::119:119)  23.066 ms  44.426 ms  23.956 ms
sander@linuxmint6 ~ $


Friday, March 6, 2009

IPv6 over KPN Mobile UMTS ... with Nokia N95: easy!

Even easier than clicking my mouse button three times: connect my Ubuntu with an USB cable (Tiberius is laughing at me about the cable) to my Nokia N95 8GB. On the Nokia, I choose "PC Suite". After a few seconds, Ubuntu shows the Nokia in the Network Manager. When I select it, the connection is working. After a few seconds, miredo / teredo IPv6 kicks in.

Wow, this is even easier than the Huawei E620 PCMCIA card.

Oh, one confession to make: I'm doing this on Ubuntu Linux 9.04 Jaunty Alpha 5. I don't know if/how this works on Ubuntu 8.10. UPDATE March 13, 2009: It works the same (thus perfectly) on Ubuntu 8.10: connect the N95, choose PC Suite, click two times on your computer, and everything works.

Tiberius is still thinking how we can connect / reflect / bridge Avahi services over IPv6. When that works, pidgin-with-bonjour is really great. And that's today's picture: pidgin with bonjour.

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ ifconfig
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:17:42:13:41:73 
          UP BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)
          Interrupt:16

lo        Link encap:Local Loopback 
          inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
          inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
          UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:16436  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)

ppp0      Link encap:Point-to-Point Protocol 
          inet addr:77.62.138.122  P-t-P:10.6.6.6  Mask:255.255.255.255
          UP POINTOPOINT RUNNING NOARP MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:103 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:109 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:3
          RX bytes:12616 (12.6 KB)  TX bytes:11763 (11.7 KB)

teredo    Link encap:UNSPEC  HWaddr 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00 
          inet6 addr: 2001:0:53aa:64c:5e:4747:b2c1:7585/32 Scope:Global
          inet6 addr: fe80::ffff:ffff:ffff/64 Scope:Link
          UP POINTOPOINT RUNNING NOARP  MTU:1280  Metric:1
          RX packets:867 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:933 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:500
          RX bytes:359027 (359.0 KB)  TX bytes:118599 (118.5 KB)

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$



IPv6 over KPN Mobile UMTS

I plugged in a (borrowed) KPN Mobile UMTS PCMCIA card (Huawei E620) into my Ubuntu system. I had to click on "Netherlands" then "KPN Mobile" then activate, and I was online with UMTS. And ... hello again ... PPP! Long time no see! ;-)

UMTS was one of the technogolies that promised to give the world IPv6. Just like IMS and others. Well ... NOT: plain IPv4.

Luckily enough IPv6 is easy to activate with miredo / teredo. One command and IPv6 was running. See below. Cool. I can now access my machines at home (SABnzbd for example), and Tiberius' music sollection, all over IPv6.




ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ ifconfig
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:17:42:13:41:73 
          UP BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)
          Interrupt:16

lo        Link encap:Local Loopback 
          inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
          inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
          UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:16436  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)

ppp0      Link encap:Point-to-Point Protocol 
          inet addr:92.69.52.174  P-t-P:10.64.64.64  Mask:255.255.255.255
          UP POINTOPOINT RUNNING NOARP MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:18409 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:11364 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:3
          RX bytes:24517667 (24.5 MB)  TX bytes:992150 (992.1 KB)

teredo    Link encap:UNSPEC  HWaddr 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00 
          inet6 addr: fe80::ffff:ffff:ffff/64 Scope:Link
          inet6 addr: 2001:0:53aa:64c:454:4747:a3ba:cb51/32 Scope:Global
          UP POINTOPOINT RUNNING NOARP  MTU:1280  Metric:1
          RX packets:234 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:237 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:500
          RX bytes:32928 (32.9 KB)  TX bytes:24480 (24.4 KB)

wlan0     Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:18:de:10:c5:06 
          UP BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)

wmaster0  Link encap:UNSPEC  HWaddr 00-18-DE-10-C5-06-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00 
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$

--

Sent from: Schiphol Nh Netherlands.

Monday, March 2, 2009

Beta-firmware with IPv6 for FRITZ! Box Fon WLAN 7270 available

Cool and good work by AVM: The beta-firmware with IPv6 for the FRITZ! Box Fon WLAN 7270 is available. Rough translation of the German announcement below:

  • enables the usage of IPv6 on your LAN and Internet
  • IPv6CP support for native IPv6 connections over PPP
  • 6to4 support
  • dual-stack for simultaneous use of IPv4 and IPv6

Questions that remain:

  • will there be a firmware with 6over4, sixxs/AYIYA, tspc and other ipv6 tunnel technologies?
  • will there be a firmware for the Fritzbox 7170. The 7170 is in widespread use, among others by Xs4all.
Bablefish translation of the German announcement here.




From the page IPv6:

FRITZ!Box Fon WLAN 7270
IPv6

Version 54.04.94-13781

FRITZ!Box ist ab sofort auch an IPv6-fähigen Provideranschlüssen einsetzbar und unterstützt natives IPv6 über PPP. Zusätzlich wird mittels der 6to4-Technik auch die Nutzung von IPv6 an herkömmlichen IPv4-Anschlüssen ermöglicht. Diese Laborversion ermöglicht die Nutzung von IPv6 im Heimnetzwerk und im Internet.

Leistungsmerkmale auf einen Blick

Ermöglicht die Nutzung von IPv6 im Heimnetzwerk und im Internet

IPv6CP-Unterstützung für native IPv6-Verbindungen über PPP an speziellen Anschlüssen

6to4-Unterstützung für die IPv6-Konnektierung über herkömmliche IPv4-Internetanbindungen

Dual Stack-Konzept für die gleichzeitige Nutzung von IPv4 und IPv6

Feedback und Details

Ihr Feedback  zu dieser Labor-Version ist uns sehr willkommen.

Wichtiger Hinweis

Wichtiger Hinweis

Diese FRITZ! Labor-Firmware für die FRITZ! Box Fon WLAN 7270 hat Beta-Status. Sie wurde von uns vor der Veröffentlichung in Standardumgebungen getestet, kann aber eventuell zu Fehlfunktionen führen. Für etwaige Schäden, die aus der Verwendung der Labor-Version entstehen, übernimmt AVM keine Haftung.

Sie können die FRITZ!Box natürlich jederzeit wieder auf die offizielle Firmware umstellen. Achtung: Dabei gehen Ihre persönlichen Einstellungen verloren. Beachten Sie darum unbedingt die  Hinweise zur Sicherung der aktuellen Einstellungen Ihrer FRITZ!Box, bevor Sie die Labor-Firmware herunterladen.

AVM leistet für diese Labor-Version keine technische Unterstützung (Support).



Friday, February 27, 2009

IPv6 via KPN Hotspots




Nice: IPv6 via KPN Hotspots' Wifi AccessPoints works. As you can see, it's good reliable teredo / miredo that does the trick.

I wonder whether KPN Hotspots has plans to provide native IPv6 from their accesspoints. As they provide NAT-less Internet connectivity (see the public IPv4 address 80.101.225.157), I guess native IPv6 could also be done. Maybe someone with KPN Hotspots experience can comment on this ... ?


rob@rob-laptop:~$ ifconfig
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:0b:5d:72:dd:a9 
          UP BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)
          Interrupt:11

eth1      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:0e:35:64:34:06 
          inet addr:80.101.225.157  Bcast:80.101.239.255  Mask:255.255.240.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::20e:35ff:fe64:3406/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:46764 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:40477 errors:0 dropped:6 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:62274668 (62.2 MB)  TX bytes:4514641 (4.5 MB)
          Interrupt:11 Base address:0x2000 Memory:d0214000-d0214fff

lo        Link encap:Local Loopback 
          inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
          inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
          UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:16436  Metric:1
          RX packets:1782 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1782 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
          RX bytes:1177684 (1.1 MB)  TX bytes:1177684 (1.1 MB)

teredo    Link encap:UNSPEC  HWaddr 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00-00 
          inet6 addr: fe80::ffff:ffff:ffff/64 Scope:Link
          inet6 addr: 2001:0:53aa:64c:107d:650f:af9a:1e62/32 Scope:Global
          UP POINTOPOINT RUNNING NOARP  MTU:1280  Metric:1
          RX packets:38260 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:34479 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:500
          RX bytes:48627476 (48.6 MB)  TX bytes:2284208 (2.2 MB)

rob@rob-laptop:~$




Monday, February 23, 2009

Enabling IPv6 support in Avahi (Zeroconf/Bonjour)

Avahi (http://avahi.org/wiki/AboutAvahi) is already installed out of the box on all recent Linux distributions, to enable IPv6 for this service make sure the /etc/avahi/avahi-daemon.conf file contains an active "use-ipv6=yes" line.

To enable m(ulticast)dns resolving of IPv6 addresses change the
"hosts: files mdns4_minimal [NOTFOUND=return] dns mdns4"
line to
"hosts: files mdns_minimal [NOTFOUND=return] dns mdns"
in the /etc/nsswitch.conf file

You probably have to restart nscd if used (/etc/init.d/nscd restart or service nscd restart)

Every IPv6 enabled host using Avahi/Zeroconf/Bonjour should now be pingable as hostname.local and visible using the avahi-discover utility

To add the .local domain as standard domain for dns queries you could add a "search local" to resolv.conf and the host is now pingable as just hostname.

Another useful option for users with a mixed Linux/Microsoft environment is to enable Microsoft hostname resolving by changing the line in /etc/nsswitch.conf to
"hosts: files mdns_minimal [NOTFOUND=return] dns mdns wins", just make sure to install winbind on the Linux host.

AVM partners with Freenet to make Fritz!Box IPv6 enabled'

The good news: AVM is going to provide firmware for their Fritx!Box 7270 that does IPv6. The bad news: the IPv6 is going to be based on 6to4 (with the 2002: addresses), which is horribly unreliable: your 6to4 IPv6 traffic will be handled by unspecified gateways around the world.


From the page 'AVM partners with Freenet to make Fritz!Box IPv6 enabled':

'AVM partners with Freenet to make Fritz!Box IPv6 enabled'

German broadband end-user equipment developer AVM, partnering with the technical department of the German ISP Freenet, has made its DSL modem line Fritz!Box compatible with the IPv6 Internet protocol. IPv6 will also be available for standard DSL connectivity in the future. To achieve this, AVM will use the 6to4 tunnelling technique to allow transport of IPv6 traffic using IPv4 addresses. AVM is placing a premium on transparency in implementation and has incorporated extensive technical documentation (RFC) for IPv6 to this end. AVM will make firmware with IPv6 available for downloading for its frontrunner model, the Fritz!Box Fon WLAN 7270 during this year's CeBIT.


But it is a first IPv6 step, of course coming from technology driven Germany. ;-)

Friday, February 20, 2009

Easy steps for IPv6 enabled Transmission 1.50 on Ubuntu

The Ubuntu repositories stilll have got an older (< 1.50) version of Transmission bittorrent client. I am even not sure which version Jaunty has or will have.

So, to get Transmission 1.50 with IPv6, you'll need to do something else: go to http://www.getdeb.net/app/Transmission and select the Ubuntu version you've got. Then download &  install the two files. I believe you have to start with the "common" file.

If downloading&installing does not work, download the two files, and the install them by hand like this:

sudo dpkg -i transmission-common_1.50-1~getdeb1_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i transmission-gtk_1.50-1~getdeb1_i386.deb

After that, transmission will do IPv6. That is: *if* you have IPv6 enabled on your Linux or MacOSX.

HTH

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Linux Mint ... Anti IPv6?

Yesterday I installed Linux Mint. It's Ubuntu based, and thus good, and hopefully even a little bit better.

Anyway: conclusion on Linux Mint so far: nice looks, but Linux Mint is oh-so anti-IPv6:

  1. ipv6 is blacklisted in /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
  2. ipv6 name resolution in Firefox is disabled via network.dns.disableIPv6
  3. after installing miredo, miredo does not autostart after a boot
I could solve 1 and 2, but so far not 3. Tips welcome.

Monday, February 16, 2009

Transmission 1.50 Released: with IPv6 support for peers, and for trackers with explicit IPv6 addresses

Cool: Transmission 1.50 has been released. To me, the most interesting part is "IPv6 support for peers, and for trackers with explicit IPv6 addresses".

Proof that it works: see the included screenshot of transmission connected to another IPv6 bittorrent peer, with happens to be a Vuze (formerly Azureus) 4.1.0.2 client.


Hooray! No more NAT problems thanks to IPv6! :-)



Saturday, February 7, 2009

What is my IPv6 address

To find out what your IPv6 address is (and thus whether you have IPv6 connectivity to the Internet), you can visit:

http://ipv6.whatismyipv6.net/

That should work for Linux and Windows XP with Teredo IPv6. It should show your IPv6 address, something like in the picture.

If it doesn't work, it could be that your IPv6 resolving does not work (like on Windows Vista with Teredo), and you visit this site:

http://[2001:4810::110]/




Friday, February 6, 2009

Teredo IPv6 on Windows XP: better than Vista's Teredo?

OMG! I was glad to report that Vista had a (only?) advantage: Teredo IPv6 on by default. However, the strange thing is that Vista won't lookup an IPv6 / AAAA if only Teredo IPv6 is activated. The result is that you cannot visit ipv6.google.com, for example. Very annoying. What's the goal of Vista's Teredo IPv6 then? Yet another closed source Microsoft mystery.

And now I discover this: On Windows XP, if Teredo IPv6 is on (two easy commands, see below), you can ping and visit sites that only have IPv6. Very good. One remark: I believe only the IPv6-only sites like ipv6.google.com are approached via IPv6.

So, does this mean XP is even on this matter better than Vista?



C:\>netsh interface ipv6 install
Ok.


C:\>netsh interface ipv6 set teredo client
Ok.


C:\>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : lokaal
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.0.2.15
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::a00:27ff:fe69:bca2%4
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 10.0.2.2

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:0:d5c7:a2d6:0:9fa9:3c0e:67f6
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%5
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : ::

Tunnel adapter Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : lokaal
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::5efe:10.0.2.15%2
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

C:\>ping ipv6.google.com

Pinging ipv6.l.google.com [2001:4860:0:1001::68] with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=217ms
Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=70ms
Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=103ms
Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=76ms

Ping statistics for 2001:4860:0:1001::68:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 70ms, Maximum = 217ms, Average = 116ms

C:\>


FWIW: the Windows XP above is running on the great VirtualBox on Ubuntu.


Major IPv6 Breakthrough: 1 ‰ of The Pirate Bay peers has IPv6

A major Breakthrough for IPv6: 1 ‰ of The Pirate Bay peers has IPv6 connectivity to the Pirate Bay (TPB). That's a whopping 1 in 1000. Or 0.1%. Or 1000 ppm (parts per million). See included pictures for the development the past day and the past week. The 1‰ was achieved in the past 24 hours.

Statistics from http://thepiratebay.org/ itself:

IPv4 20.400.519 peers
IPv6 21.019 peers

(So: 20 million versus 21 thousand)

IPv6 is growing! ;-)




Wednesday, February 4, 2009

Teredo IPv6 on Vista: no AAAA resolving by applications ... ?

Can someone please help, or explain? A Windows Vista machine has IPv6 connectivity (using Teredo), it can resolve IPv6/AAAA addresses using nslookup, it can ping literal IPv6 addresses, but ... it can not ping (nor browse) to a IPv6 domain name like ipv6.google.com. See below.

What's causing this? How can I solve this so that a "ping ipv6.google.com" just works?



Microsoft Windows [Version 6.0.6001]
Copyright (c) 2006 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.


C:\>nslookup ipv6.google.com
Server:  UnKnown
Address:  192.168.1.254

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:    ipv6.l.google.com
Address:  2001:4860:0:1001::68
Aliases:  ipv6.google.com

C:\>ping ipv6.google.com
Ping request could not find host ipv6.google.com. Please check the name and try again.

C:\>ping 2001:4860:0:1001::68

Pinging 2001:4860:0:1001::68 from 2001:0:d5c7:a2d6:2c9c:d8d7:ad55:e84b with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=284ms
Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=194ms
Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=76ms
Reply from 2001:4860:0:1001::68: time=184ms

Ping statistics for 2001:4860:0:1001::68:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 76ms, Maximum = 284ms, Average = 184ms

C:\>


Sunday, February 1, 2009

DynDNS, IPv6, ddclient and dns6.org

Cool: you can store your (static and dynamic) IPv6 addresses on dns6.org. That's easier than typing or even remembering all those hexadecimal bytes.

So create an account on www.dns6.org and create a hostname with your IPv6 address. If you can access the from your IPv6 system, it will fill out your IPv6 address automagically. That's it. It just works.

I'm now playing with ddclient and wget to announce updates of my IPv6 addresses (when working with teredo / miredo).

So far my ddclient.conf looks like this:

sander@flappie:~$ cat /etc/ddclient.conf
# Configuration file for ddclient generated by debconf
#
# /etc/ddclient.conf

pid=/var/run/ddclient.pid
protocol=dyndns2
# use=if, if=
#use=if, if=web
use=web
server=www.dns6.org
login=MyName
password='MyPass'
MyHost.dns6.org
sander@flappie:~$


I'm also trying to do the update with wget:


Results are not yet clear.

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Transmission Bittorrent client: 1.50 (with IPv6 support) in Beta 3

As said earlier, the Transmission bittorrent client for Linux and Mac OS X will have IPv6 support in version 1.50. The Beta 3 of version 1.50 is available:

About 1.50: 1.50 doesn't have many visual changes, but has lots of improvements under the hood, including IPv6 support, better management of peers, trackers, and local files, and lots of bug fixes.

Hopefully Ubuntu 9.04 will use TransmissionBT 1.50. Together with miredo (teredo implementation) this should raise the number of IPv6 enabled peers.

Monday, January 26, 2009

The Pirate Bay on IPv6

The Pirate Bay has announced they have started introducing IPv6. See here.

The nice thing: on their front page they announce how much IPv6 is involved. At this moment (26 jan 2009) the statistics are:

IPv4 22.616.475 peers (10.033.680 seeders + 12.582.795 leechers) in 1.631.921 torrents on tracker.
IPv6 16.087 peers (6.522 seeders + 9.565 leechers) in 13.058 torrents on tracker.

So: about 0.07% of the peers is connected via IPv6. Probably better to speak in parts-per-million, which is here around 700. In other words: of each 1.000.000 PirateBay peers, 700 have an IPv6 connection to the PirateBay.

My own measurements: the IPv6 HTTP connection to the tracker is very slow (45 s = 45.000 ms), whereas the ping6 is fast (50-60 ms):


sander@flappie:~$ time wget -6 http://tracker.thepiratebay.org/
--18:34:09--  http://tracker.thepiratebay.org/
           => `index.html'
Resolving tracker.thepiratebay.org... 2a01:298:3:1::2
Connecting to tracker.thepiratebay.org|2a01:298:3:1::2|:80... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 404 Not Found
18:34:54 ERROR 404: Not Found.


real    0m45.137s
user    0m0.004s
sys     0m0.008s

sander@flappie:~$ ping6 -c 5 tracker.thepiratebay.org
PING tracker.thepiratebay.org(2a01:298:3:1::2) 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 2a01:298:3:1::2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=50 time=60.5 ms
64 bytes from 2a01:298:3:1::2: icmp_seq=2 ttl=50 time=72.4 ms
64 bytes from 2a01:298:3:1::2: icmp_seq=3 ttl=50 time=51.6 ms
64 bytes from 2a01:298:3:1::2: icmp_seq=4 ttl=50 time=52.6 ms
64 bytes from 2a01:298:3:1::2: icmp_seq=5 ttl=50 time=52.3 ms

--- tracker.thepiratebay.org ping statistics ---
5 packets transmitted, 5 received, 0% packet loss, time 4002ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 51.694/57.922/72.424/7.940 ms
sander@flappie:~$

The IPv4 connection is very fast:


sander@flappie:~$ time wget -4 http://tracker.thepiratebay.org/
--18:34:07--  http://tracker.thepiratebay.org/
           => `index.html'
Resolving tracker.thepiratebay.org... 77.247.176.134, 77.247.176.132, 77.247.176.153, ...
Connecting to tracker.thepiratebay.org|77.247.176.134|:80... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 404 Not Found
18:34:07 ERROR 404: Not Found.


real    0m0.084s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.008s



I guess the HTTP speed will get normal.




Monday, January 12, 2009

DIY: Google IPv6 Trusted Tester program

Google has a "IPv6 Trusted Tester program". It means selected IPv6 users can get IPv6 access to Google services. To get selected, Google must trust your ISP and your ISP's IPv6. See here (IPv6) or here (IPv4). Xs4all is a trusted ISP. See here (Dutch!).

What if your ISP is not "trusted" by Google, but your IPv6 is working perfectly, for example via Sixxs or Teredo/Miredo?

No problem: fill out this in your /etc/hosts file:

2001:4860:0:1001::53 googlemail.l.google.com
2001:4860:0:1001::53 mail.google.com

2001:4860:0:1001::68 www.google.com
2001:4860:0:1001::68 www.l.google.com
2001:4860:0:1001::68 www.google.nl

(That last line with .nl is needed for me because www.google.com redirects to www.google.nl.)

Then restart your browser. Go to mail.google.com and it will be over IPv6. You can proof that with tcpdump/wireshark, or get a good feeling with the firefox plugin ShowIP

See included screendump: right bottom corner shows a green IPv6 address.


Sunday, January 11, 2009

Old Trick: this blog via IPv6

You can view this website via IPv6 by using the URL http://ipv6-or-no-ipv6.blogspot.com.ipv6.sixxs.org/

It's an old trick, provided by the people from Sixxs: just fill out "ipv6.sixxs.org" at the end of (the FQDN part) of an URL. Examples:

http://www.cnn.com.ipv6.sixxs.org/
http://geenstijl.nl.ipv6.sixxs.org/

The other way around is possible too: Make an IPv6 site accessible site via IPv4. So: you --- IPv4 --- sixxs --- IPv6 --- website. Example:

http://www.whatismyipv6.net.ipv4.sixxs.org/
http://www.ipv6.surfnet.nl.ipv4.sixxs.org/

Just for fun.